Child of Light Part 2: The Music, the Graphics, and The Little Things.

Last time on Child of Light, I discussed the essential parts to game in the attempt to mask my scheduling, from the story, characters, and gameplay elements in both a critical and bias way. Now it’s time for me to discuss the other aspects world of Lemuria, from its stellar music to its side quests that are alright. Was this a necessary post? Maybe. Was it for quantity? Ask my dead integrity.

Music: Beats by Coeur

“Igniculus shined like the sun and melted my eyes…”

Video game music is my sh!t, and Child of Light delivers a soundtrack that slaps hard! Admittedly, I am not the best when it comes to talking about music. Like, how do you I put the feelings onto words in the most accurate way when I feel a mixture of emotions from it? Well, I’ll give it my best shot. The music, by Coeur de Pirate, has this fantastical yet melancholic feel to it, relying on pure instruments emphasizing on piano, violins, and flutes, to amply the magic of the world. It turns the adventure into a fairytale and it gives the game its own identity. Child of Light wouldn’t be what it is without its soundtrack.

Traveling around Lemuria is a musical dream, presenting a crisp orchestra as you solve puzzles and fly around the sky. From “Patches in the Sky” to “Pilgrims of a Long Journey,” it sets the tone of magic and wonder while its undertones remind you, past the beauty, of the torment of Umbra. I can really only compare it to how Metroid sets the tone with its music, which creates a soft ambience filled with techno beeps to create an eerie feel as you travel through the planet or space station. Coeur’s music is like a classic Disney movie, at least what a classic Disney film is meant to represent to a kid. It’s beautiful on the first run but still retains the magic on subsequent listens. Basically, when it was good.

I personally love “Patches in the Sky,” playing as you go to the Temple of the Moon. The piano has this soft soul underneath its violin, telling how close you are to the “end” of your journey. It captures the wonder of this flying…city? I don’t quite know what the structures are supposed to be in this section. Ruins? The circus? An abandoned town? Whatever Tristis decided to kill himself in, the pure sight of it fills the imagination and the music helps create the awe-inspiring feeling. It’s the track I give subsequent listens for studying.

Now, the battle music is the peak of this game. It actually contrasts the peaceful melody’s of the overworld music. Like this is some Lord of the Rings level of epic and triumphant. The music makes every battle feel like your in Mordor winning, but the eye of Sauron is just above the horizon. Especially “Jupiter’s Lightning,” this trumpet loving song that’s a regular battle theme disguised as a boss theme. It amplifies the fight in spectacular ways, and I’ll admit to getting pumped. It makes me want to fight enemies just to hear it. The other battle themes are great too, but Jupiter is the best one. Coeur managed to create one of the best regular battle themes in JRPG history, better than the many Final Fantasy or Pokemon themes.

“Oh no, my Golem is going to be hit by a grass move. Why did Gamefreak also make him ground type!”

And, that’s what this music is to me. It’s some of the best songs I’ve heard in a JRPG and captures what the genre has to offer. It creates the feeling of a high fantasy ye feels unique compared to others trying to create the same effect. Maybe it’s just me, but Couer’s soundtrack is something to behold for yourself. I really recommend the video about how she made the music, going from simple to orchestrated when it came to the boss fights.

Graphics: A Moving Painting

“Yo, Aang is to the west. Pay attention for any fishermen huts, they’ll have the monk your looking for.”

The game utilizes the Rayman Legend’s engine, but has such a different presentation compared to whatever the hell Rayman is supposed to be. Seriously, every time I watch my brother play it, I ask, “the hell happened to his limbs?!” Child of Light on the Switch is a visual beauty, a moving painting that compliments the game’s high fantasy. A lot of the game’s color scheme has this nice blue hue to it of varying degrees, but it does journey into warmer colors for places like Bolmus Poppuli. The developers made it so the background wasn’t static or lifeless. Many characters and monsters roam around in the background landscapes that give the world more depth. Sonic did this all the way back in the 80s, showcasing spanning cities or luscious forests as a backdrop, but 2d games (at least the one’s I’ve played as a gaming scrub) in recent years are able to have these backdrops so animated its visually stunning and leaves a lot to the imagination. The most iconic moment is the beginning, seeing this giant roam the Earth as you walk across a small stream.

Animations for Aurora are equally impressive, such as her hair physics. It sways everywhere you go, raising up when being healed by Igniculus, and sometimes covers her face. Her hair is like Medusa from Marvel. The locks have a mind on their own. Though, Aurora and her family are kind of the only 3d models in the overworld. Everyone else is a 2d “sprite” if sprites were just bio pics. This never becomes jarring since their animations are just as fluid as Aurora’s. It’s a few head nods but it keeps them from becoming cardboard cutouts. I’m surprised the writers didn’t have a moment where one town was struck frozen by Umbra to the point where they did look like a drift store prop.

The battle animations are great, specifically with the monsters. Each are given 4 kinds of movements, individual to their design. When attacking, archers fire arrows while rocks just hop in place (at least this one has an excuse Gamefreak!). Some are better than others, since the archers have this weird lag with the sound effect with firing. Monsters have a “push back” animation when hit, making attacks feel powerful. This is the same with the heroes, so battles end up with more weight to it. Monsters have a charge up animation, which vary in quality. Some reflect their design, like how the archer backs up like he’s charging the bow, while many are just “get big!” These compensation ones are just boring since they revert to normal size. I wish they stayed in their big boy forms, then lose it when they release their charge. Finally, there is the “almost dead” phase, where they visibly look down as if they’re getting scolded by their principle for being creative. It’s small but appreciated since enemies don’t have life bars. All of this makes regular grind fodder have life to them.

And that’s what Child of Light’s presentation is. On the big screen, it’ll take your breath away how beautiful Lemuria is. It’s water-color, cartoon artstyle stands out so well, making it one of the most recognizable games on the Switch. There’s barely any lag, so visuals pop onto the screen no problem. I highly suggest playing on a large TV. the handheld mode is good, but the TV’s presentation is way better.

Sidequests: In this Time Frame?

“Miraculous! Something something french, something something I stalk a blonde boy…Miraculous!”

Yeah, the sidequests are all…okay. I’m primarily talking about the ones you get from NPCS. I’ll get into the secrets later. The main characters do have sidequests that fit their character, such as saving the Kategida clan or getting Rubella’s brother. My personal favorite is the Kategida one since it’s in a labrynth puzzle that has actual ties to the lore of the game. However, none of the others are fun to do besides the reward. They’re the kind of sidequests that are just chores, like “kill these spiders in front of my lawn” or “get my flying pig back!” Yes, pigs do fly in Lemuria so any excuse you have is invalid. You could honestly skip them because they add nothing to the plot or the NPCS’ character in an interesting way. It’s one of the game’s weakest points.

Secrets: You Found the Thing!

The most interesting of Lemuria’s secrets are literal flying paper. Scattered throughout the world are diary letters that go further in-depth of Lemuria’s lore, primarily focusing on the explorers that were the ancestors of Aurora and Umbra. They aren’t too hard to find since flying, ripped paper in a world full of monsters will stand out, plus they continue the poetic writing of the dialogue.

Alongside the paper are the stardust’s, which are the game’s stat increase items. Same idea as the other things around, but their very much in the open. They can be taken by Igniculus, so they’re the easiest out of the collectables. Some are even rewards for side quests, such as the trade sequence. They still do that right? I’m still behind the times on gaming, correct?

“Ah yes, the most challenging of bosses: Darumaka’s sentient turds.

Smaller “dungeons” lay hidden, mostly within doors with a gem or a random entrance in a dungeon. Most of them contain puzzles that are just “fly fast” or a boss. On that note, a lot of the puzzles in the game are pretty simple. It’s one of the game’s weaker points since most are just flying through wind, moving block, or lighting stuff up. Nothing really worth wild or memorable. The rewards are more of the same: gems and potions. I do like the idea of bigger versions of enemies acting as bosses, but many of them use the same strategies. They’re just…bigger.

Annnddd…that’s all I have left. Now for my 2nd overview.

Overview

“Don’t get all mushy about it. I want your gold you European murderer, now hand it over!”

Like I said in Part 1, I really enjoyed this small JRPG for managing to bring back that classic fairytale feel with a great story and fun battle mechanics. The smaller aspects of the game are just as good, especially the music and the graphics, though the side quests and collectibles are the game’s weaker points. Many sidequests feel uninspired and the puzzles, while fun for a while with some good rewards, become lackluster.

Anyway, these are just my thoughts on the game. I hope you had a fun experience just as I did. I highly recommend checking out how the developers created the game through their series on Ubisoft’s Youtube channel. They’re short and sweet, but a great way to understand the magic behind the game. Anyway, I’ll hope you’ll return whenever the f to read me write more swear words than the lord would permit because I’m tackling Kamen Rider Saber, because 2020 decided to spawn both a virus and this show.

-Samuel Argueta

Mobile Suit Gundam: The Compilation

Can you spot the new addiction throughout my recent posts? It’s not the heroine manning my writing.

I watched the entire original Gundam show through 3 compilation movies on the youtube channel GundamInfo. I thought it was an incredible show and start for the franchise, but the compilations themselves were pretty alright. Especially found in the second movie, I could tell that too much was put in and a lot of the fleshed-out details like character and story bits were rushed because of it. A great show, but okay movies.

The year UC 0079, and the Principality of Zeon have waged a rebellion against the Earth for independence, thus starting the One Year War. Also they dropped a colony. The Zabi Family, at the head of Zeon, lead their soldiers using the revolutionary change to warfare: Mobile Suits. On Site 7, young Nuke Amuro Gunray witnesses the terror of war as No-Goufs Boy 2’s wage an attack on the Federation’s secret weapon stashed in the colony. Amuro ignores his father as he enters into the cockpit of Earth’s greatest turning point, the RX-78 Gundam, to defeat the enemy soldiers.

Now, forced with other children to fight in the war in the White Base (yes it’s called that) Amuro and the Gundam (and I guess the Guntank and Guncannon) will change the course of One Year War while ignoring the other Gundams that come along later. Idk, I haven’t watched them all yet.

Ungifted

So, real talk. I didn’t plan a book post well because I had school and I didn’t know what to do about screenshot jokes. So, here’s my apology recommendation. I swear, it’s still better written than Captain Marvel.

Young Donovan Navonod is a middle school kid so reckless he makes my 1 am walks seem smarter. One day, he smacks the thicc @ss of a statue and causes it’s bronze world to smash into the nearby gym. Does he get in trouble? No, he gets accidently awarded by being transferred to the gifted program school. Now, with the school district superintendent on his trail, he has to keep low while having to fake his way long enough for the drama to die down. However, it turns out that the smart kids may value him more than they could have thought.

I really hope that read with that generic synopsis voice for all those kids movies. I thought of writing generic lines like “Now, he’ll learn that he may be the best thing for the smart kids” or something like that. That’s my critic on the back of the book, which was literally written by that generic guy voice in all those trailers.

A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum

Hey, remember that weird movie review I did for that elf movie. Please don’t read it. Anyway, something that I don’t talk about much is my love for classic films. I mainly mean from the 60s to the 80s. Westworld, Logan’s Run, Dr Strangelove, Forbidden Planet, and a bunch of others. There is something beloved about the old ways they would create the worlds of the films, having to rely on the practical rather than today’s CGI reliance.

I watched this film for a drama class I’m taking, and it is seriously one of the funniest comedies out there. It’s very simple humor, but the physical comedy and clever dialogue is so witty it reminds me of a Monty Python film. I also love the camera work since it’s so good at adapting to the emotions of the scene, whether it be made into quick shots for the humor or angled shots for a character’s anxiety. It’s genuinely well-made for a 60s film and has some of the most unique visuals I’ve seen from a film from it’s era. At least to me.

In this adaptation of a musical and kind of Pseudolus, our MC is the conniving slave looking to obtain his freedom. When his masters’ son, Hero, wants to marry a girl in the slave house next door, he makes a deal that’ll get them both what they truly desire. What comes next is an elaborate plot of madness as the slave tries to hook the two up while more and more complications arise, especially in the form of the girl’s buyer Captain Miles Glorious, who will burn everything to get his bride. With some of the best actor performances and chemistry, with a mixture of comedy and clever writing, this is a classic that’ll make you holler every 5 minutes.

Published by penname2001

I am an aspiring writer working on one book, but also on a blog and short stories for my website. I like writing about horror, comedy, and fantasy, but I am not picky on a genre as long as it interests me. On my spare time, I like to read, play video games, watch anime and various shows and movies, and live life to the best of my ability.

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